Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Demographic, Laboratory and Clinical Comparison of Pediatric Brucella Cases with and without Liver Involvement

Version 1 : Received: 28 August 2019 / Approved: 29 August 2019 / Online: 29 August 2019 (17:22:42 CEST)

How to cite: Agin, M.; Kayar, Y. Demographic, Laboratory and Clinical Comparison of Pediatric Brucella Cases with and without Liver Involvement. Preprints 2019, 2019080314 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201908.0314.v1). Agin, M.; Kayar, Y. Demographic, Laboratory and Clinical Comparison of Pediatric Brucella Cases with and without Liver Involvement. Preprints 2019, 2019080314 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201908.0314.v1).

Abstract

Background and Objective: In the present study, the purpose was to compare the demographic, clinical and laboratory results of pediatric brucella cases who had liver involvement and who had no specific organ involvement. Material and Methods: The data of 248 patients between 2 and 18 years of age diagnosed with Brucellosis between July 2017 and August 2018 were analyzed retrospectively. The patients who had liver involvement and who did not have other specific organ involvement were compared in terms of presentation, physical examination findings, age, gender, hemogram, AST, ALT, GGT, ALP, bilirubines, sedimentation, CRP, clinical and laboratory findings, and culture and relapse rates. Results: No significant differences were detected between the patients who had liver involvement (n=92) and who did not have specific organ involvement (n=156) in terms of diagnosis age and gender. Loss of appetite, nausea and sensitive stomach were higher in the patients who had hepatic involvement, and weariness was determined to be more in the control group patients. In the patients who had hepatic involvement, the hemoglobin and platelet values were lower, and the sedimentation, CRP and blood culture growth were higher. The relapse rates were lower in patients who had liver involvement. Conclusion: In patients who have liver involvement, in addition to elevated hepatomegaly and transaminase levels, the growth rate of the acute-phase reactants and brucella is higher in blood culture; and the relapse rate is lower after treatment. Brucellosis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of hepatomegaly and transaminase elevation where brucellosis is seen endemically. We believe that early diagnosis of brucellosis is important in treatment response.

Subject Areas

brucellosis; elevated liver enzymes; hepatomegaly; children

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.