Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Biophilic Architecture for Restoration and Therapy within the Built Environment: A Review

Version 1 : Received: 26 July 2019 / Approved: 28 July 2019 / Online: 28 July 2019 (17:24:11 CEST)

How to cite: Asim, F.; Shree, V. Biophilic Architecture for Restoration and Therapy within the Built Environment: A Review. Preprints 2019, 2019070323 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201907.0323.v1). Asim, F.; Shree, V. Biophilic Architecture for Restoration and Therapy within the Built Environment: A Review. Preprints 2019, 2019070323 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201907.0323.v1).

Abstract

Can ‘restoration and therapy in design’ signify something more than the places like hospitals and healing gardens? Can those restorative environments be brought inside the working and living environments to mitigate the psychological problem at the source? The main objective of this paper is to look at the strategies and developments of Biophilic design with respect to therapy and restoration in order to achieve sustainability in terms of quality of life within the immediate built-environment. The paper explores the mental health issues under the domains of built-environment and indoor environment with respect to their connection with nature. Biophilic design has gained a favourable momentum within the last four decades and is now visualised as a medium that bridges the gap between humans and the nature. Out of a variety of measures of sustainable environmental design, biophilic design focuses on the end-results of naturally nurtured or inspired habitats and workplaces. It embodies strategies of Green and Intelligent buildings, works as a mitigation strategy for foul indoor environment and establishes the vision that veristic sustainability can only be achieved if there is qualitative control over human physiological prosperity and psychological health. In context of work efficiency, preference and productivity within the indoor environment, it is seen as a promoter of constructive thoughts and enhancer of creativity. The paper aims to enlist biophilic design and retrofitting strategies, which can improve cognitive function, reduce stress and provide mental peace within the built environment.

Subject Areas

biophilia; biophilic design; sustainability; sustainable architecture; built environment; well-being; restorative environment

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