Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Evolution and Collapse of Ejidos in Mexico: How Far is Communal Land Used for Urban Development?

Version 1 : Received: 25 July 2019 / Approved: 26 July 2019 / Online: 26 July 2019 (16:40:05 CEST)

How to cite: Schumacher, M.; Durán-Díaz, P.; Kurjenoja, A.K.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, E.; González-Rivas, D.A. Evolution and Collapse of Ejidos in Mexico: How Far is Communal Land Used for Urban Development?. Preprints 2019, 2019070302 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201907.0302.v1). Schumacher, M.; Durán-Díaz, P.; Kurjenoja, A.K.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, E.; González-Rivas, D.A. Evolution and Collapse of Ejidos in Mexico: How Far is Communal Land Used for Urban Development?. Preprints 2019, 2019070302 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201907.0302.v1).

Abstract

The ejido system in Mexico based on communal land was transformed for private ownership due to neoliberal trends during 1990. This research describes the evolution of Mexican land policies that changed the ejido system into private development to answer why land tenure change is shaping urban growth. To demonstrate this, municipalities of San Andrés Cholula and Ocoyucan were selected as a case study. Within this context, we evaluated how much ejido land is being urbanized due to real estate market forces and what type of urbanization model is created. These two areas represent different development scales: S.A. Cholula where its ejidos were expropriated as part of a regional urban development plan; and Ocoyucan where its ejidos and rural land were reached by private developers without local planning. To analyze both municipalities, historical satellite images from Google Earth were used with GRASS GIS 7.4 and corrected with QGIS 2.18. We found that privatization of ejidos fragmented and segregated the rural world for the construction of massive gated-communities. Therefore, a disturbing land tenure change occurred during the last 30 years, hence this research questions the role of local authorities in permitting land use change without regulations or local planning. The resulting urbanization model is a private sector development that isolates rural communities in their own territories, for which we provide recommendations.

Subject Areas

land tenure in Mexico; ejido system; land expropriation; gated-communities; San Andrés Cholula; Ocoyucan

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