Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Findings from a Pilot Led Bulb Exchange Program at a Neighborhood Scale

Version 1 : Received: 12 June 2019 / Approved: 13 June 2019 / Online: 13 June 2019 (08:24:27 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Witt, S.M.; Stults, S.; Rieves, E.; Emerson, K.; Mendoza, D.L. Findings from a Pilot Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Bulb Exchange Program at a Neighborhood Scale. Sustainability 2019, 11, 3965. Witt, S.M.; Stults, S.; Rieves, E.; Emerson, K.; Mendoza, D.L. Findings from a Pilot Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Bulb Exchange Program at a Neighborhood Scale. Sustainability 2019, 11, 3965.

Journal reference: Sustainability 2019, 11, 3965
DOI: 10.3390/su11143965

Abstract

In the U.S. 44% of low-income households struggle to pay their utility bills, affecting their ability to afford necessities such as food and health expenses. Several government and utility funded energy efficiency programs exist to assist those experiencing energy insecurity. In Salt Lake City, Utah, there is a high demand for, but low availability of, energy efficiency services in underserved neighborhoods creating an opportunity for creative community-based programs to fill this inherent gap. This pilot project, involving the exchanging of LED bulbs in Salt Lake City, highlights the development of a community-based energy efficiency program that aims to bring energy savings to a uniquely targeted portion of the city and determines its feasibility in addressing energy insecurity at a larger scale. Through the 8-month project duration, 1,432 bulbs were exchanged at 23 events reaching 181 households in low-income areas. Through a year of use, these bulbs are estimated to save residents approximately 18,219 USD in electricity bills and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants by 122.23 metric tons, in addition to a savings of 4,400 USD in social cost of carbon as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Since this pilot reached less than 1% of households, we extrapolated a reach of 2%, 5%, and 7.5% and found substantial potential decreases in power plant emissions and financial savings. As this project is ongoing and being expanded, we discuss relevant findings that will help shape future community-based models so that they are appropriately deployed and more effective in alleviating local energy insecurity.

Subject Areas

LED lighting; energy efficiency; electricity consumption; social cost of carbon; CO2 emissions; community programs

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