Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Sleep Disturbances are Consequences or Mediators between Socioeconomic Status and Health: A Scoping Review

Version 1 : Received: 28 May 2019 / Approved: 29 May 2019 / Online: 29 May 2019 (14:48:06 CEST)

How to cite: Etindele Sosso, F.A.; Papadopoulos, D..; Surani, S.R..; Curcio, G. Sleep Disturbances are Consequences or Mediators between Socioeconomic Status and Health: A Scoping Review. Preprints 2019, 2019050353 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201905.0353.v1). Etindele Sosso, F.A.; Papadopoulos, D..; Surani, S.R..; Curcio, G. Sleep Disturbances are Consequences or Mediators between Socioeconomic Status and Health: A Scoping Review. Preprints 2019, 2019050353 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201905.0353.v1).

Abstract

The variations in socioeconomic status (SES) between different social classes of a population correspond to differences in accessibility to all resources available and able to improve global health. SES can influence global health trajectory for an individual or a community, depending if SES is low or high. Sleep is sensitive to environmental stimuli, as well as living conditions. Plenty of studies linked sleep complaints with mood disorders, allostatic load or circadian disruption; but very few or none investigated deeply what happened earlier to sleep depending of SES. While SES is now known as one of the main determinants for a good health and a good aging, its influence on sleep disorders (SD) is not well understood. SES is a concept, not directly observable but estimated using indicators like income, education, occupational status and area of living. Even if recent evidence suggested that few of SES indicators like occupational status are linked with sleep disturbances, the relation between SES and health in general with sleep as an outcome or a mediator is not well documented. This scoping review synthetized studies which investigated physiological and psychological mechanisms resulting from a low SES and linked them with sleep disturbances as consequences or as mediators. This review also explore a possible role played by sleep in the relation between socioeconomic status and health inequalities.

Subject Areas

sleep disorders; socioeconomic status; mediator; allostatic load; health; scoping review

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