Preprint Communication Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Factors Affecting Nonmarket Fruit and Vegetable Receiving: Analyses of Two Cross-Sectional Surveys in Gunma, Japan

Version 1 : Received: 15 May 2019 / Approved: 16 May 2019 / Online: 16 May 2019 (10:32:55 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 23 October 2019 / Approved: 24 October 2019 / Online: 24 October 2019 (10:58:58 CEST)

How to cite: Machida, D.; Yoshida, T. Factors Affecting Nonmarket Fruit and Vegetable Receiving: Analyses of Two Cross-Sectional Surveys in Gunma, Japan. Preprints 2019, 2019050205 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201905.0205.v1). Machida, D.; Yoshida, T. Factors Affecting Nonmarket Fruit and Vegetable Receiving: Analyses of Two Cross-Sectional Surveys in Gunma, Japan. Preprints 2019, 2019050205 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201905.0205.v1).

Abstract

In this communication, we clarified the factors affecting the nonmarket fruit and vegetable (FV) receiving frequency. For Survey 1, we conducted a cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire for men aged 50—74 in city (A) in Gunma, Japan. Participants were asked questions regarding FV receiving frequency, FV gardening, social cohesion (4 to 20 points), and basic characteristics. For Survey 2, a similar survey was conducted for residents aged 20—74 in three areas in city (B) in Gunma, but we added more variables. For analysis, ordinal logistic regression models were used. In the survey 1, 243 participants were used for analysis. As a result, FV receiving frequency was positively associated with non-gardeners, and social cohesion. In Survey 2, 791 participants were used for analyses. For Survey 2, vegetable receiving frequency was positively associated with rural and suburban area, family structure, employment status, and non-farmers. The relationship between receiving frequency and social cohesion was similar to that found in Survey 1. In conclusion, in areas where FV cultivation flourished, it appears easy to obtain FV through the social networks of receiving, even for those who are not cultivating themselves.

Subject Areas

fruit and vegetable intake; fruit and vegetable receiving; locally-grown products; local food system; nonmarket food; social cohesion

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