Preprint Article Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

Moving Surface Boundary Layer Control Analysis and the Influence of the Magnus Effect on an Aerofoil with a Leading-Edge Rotating Cylinder

Version 1 : Received: 13 May 2019 / Approved: 14 May 2019 / Online: 14 May 2019 (12:17:23 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 16 May 2019 / Approved: 17 May 2019 / Online: 17 May 2019 (13:06:27 CEST)

How to cite: Salam, M.A.; Ebna Hai, B.S.M.; Ali, M.A.T.; Bhadra, D.; Khan, N.A. Moving Surface Boundary Layer Control Analysis and the Influence of the Magnus Effect on an Aerofoil with a Leading-Edge Rotating Cylinder. Preprints 2019, 2019050170 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201905.0170.v2). Salam, M.A.; Ebna Hai, B.S.M.; Ali, M.A.T.; Bhadra, D.; Khan, N.A. Moving Surface Boundary Layer Control Analysis and the Influence of the Magnus Effect on an Aerofoil with a Leading-Edge Rotating Cylinder. Preprints 2019, 2019050170 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201905.0170.v2).

Abstract

A number of experimental and numerical studies point out that incorporating a rotating cylinder can superiorly enhance the aerofoil performance, especially for higher velocity ratios. Yet, there have been less or no studies exploring the effects of lower velocity ratio at a higher Reynolds number. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Moving Surface Boundary-layer Control (MSBC) at lower velocity ratios (i.e. cylinder tangential velocity to free stream velocity) and higher Reynolds number on a symmetric aerofoil (e.g. NACA 0021) and an asymmetric aerofoil (e.g. NACA 23018). In particular, the aerodynamic performance with and without rotating cylinder at the leading edge of the NACA 0021 and NACA 23018 aerofoil was studied on the wind tunnel installed at Aerodynamics Laboratory. The aerofoil section was tested in the low subsonic wind tunnel, and the lift coefficient and the drag coefficient were studied for different angles of attack. The experiments were conducted for two Reynolds numbers: 200000 and 250000 corresponding to two free stream velocities: 20 m/s and 25 m/s, respectively, for six different angle of attacks (-5°, 0°, 5°, 10°, 15° and 20°). This study demonstrates that the incorporation of a leading edge rotating cylinder results in an increase of lift coefficient at lower angle of attacks (maximum around 33%) and delay in stall angle (from 10° to 15°) relative to the aerofoil without rotating cylinder.

Subject Areas

Moving surface boundary layer control; symmetric aerofoil; asymmetric aerofoil; velocity ratio; Magnus effect; lift coefficient; drag coefficient

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.