Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Digital Media Consumption and Youth's Interests in Ecosystem Services, Sustainability and Science as a Means for Disease Prevention

Version 1 : Received: 9 May 2019 / Approved: 13 May 2019 / Online: 13 May 2019 (10:03:54 CEST)

How to cite: Niankara, I.; Al-adwan, M.N. Digital Media Consumption and Youth's Interests in Ecosystem Services, Sustainability and Science as a Means for Disease Prevention. Preprints 2019, 2019050150 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201905.0150.v1). Niankara, I.; Al-adwan, M.N. Digital Media Consumption and Youth's Interests in Ecosystem Services, Sustainability and Science as a Means for Disease Prevention. Preprints 2019, 2019050150 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201905.0150.v1).

Abstract

Along with the advantages associated with access to information and fast communication, screen time from increased digital media consumption has recently been associated with adverse effects on youth well-being. To get a clearer picture of its value for global youth based sustainability initiatives, this study investigates the effects of increased digital media consumption on youth's interests in ecosystem services, sustainability and science as a means for disease prevention. We achieve this, using data on 187821 adolescent students from 50 countries worldwide. Methodologically, we rely on a mixed bivariate ordered probit representation of youth's joint interest in the biosphere (ecosystem services and sustainability) and science as a means for disease prevention, which we then estimate using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Methods.  We found that each level increase in adolescent students' reported frequency of news blogs visits and web browsing on broad science adversely affect their interests in ecosystem services, sustainability and science as a means for disease prevention. Although each level increase in youth's frequency of ecological website visits also reduces by 20% (with 95% CI [-0.36; -0.32]) their interests in the biosphere, it is found to increase however by 3% (with 95% CI [0.02; 0.05]) their interest science as a means for disease prevention. Overall, our results highlight heterogeneous effects of digital media consumption on adolescents' well-being in terms of their interests in ecosystem services, sustainability, and science as a means for disease prevention.

Supplementary and Associated Material

Subject Areas

Bayesian methods; digital media; ecosystem services; Sustainable development; youth health

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