Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Phototactic Response of the Oriental Armyworm, Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), to Light-Emitting Diode Lights of Different Wavelengths

Version 1 : Received: 30 April 2019 / Approved: 5 May 2019 / Online: 5 May 2019 (11:18:56 CEST)

How to cite: Kim, K.; Song, H.; Choe, R.; Huang, Z.; Huang, Q.; Lei, C. Phototactic Response of the Oriental Armyworm, Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), to Light-Emitting Diode Lights of Different Wavelengths. Preprints 2019, 2019050014 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201905.0014.v1). Kim, K.; Song, H.; Choe, R.; Huang, Z.; Huang, Q.; Lei, C. Phototactic Response of the Oriental Armyworm, Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), to Light-Emitting Diode Lights of Different Wavelengths. Preprints 2019, 2019050014 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201905.0014.v1).

Abstract

Recently, light traps using light-emitting diode (LED) lights have been applied to monitor or control insect pests. The oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata Walker, is an important insect pest that has caused damage to several cereal crops, including corn, wheat and rice. The present study aims to seek out a sensitive wavelength causing high phototactic response in M. separata. The study evaluated the phototactic responses of M. separata moths to several LED lights of different wavelengths and luminance intensities under laboratory condition. Results showed that green (520 nm) LED light resulted in significant phototactic response of M. separata moths compared to LED lights of other wavelengths. Additionally, the highest attraction rate of the moths to green LED light appeared in luminance intensity group of 200 lux compared to the other intensities groups. Experiments under optimum conditions based on the above experiments revealed that the green LED light exhibited the strongest attraction rate (64.44%) among all experimental groups. An experiment performed in a net cage also showed that green LED light resulted in the highest phototactic response of M. separata moths, 1.7 times more than a commercial black light used as control. These findings clearly demonstrate that M. separata moths have a high sensitivity to the green LED light. Therefore, a light trap equipped with green LED light could be useful for monitoring and controlling M. separata moths.

Subject Areas

phototactic response; Mythimna separata; LED; wavelength; attraction rate; luminance intensity; sensitivity

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.