Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Studying a Light Sensor with Light: Multiphoton Imaging in the Retina

Version 1 : Received: 25 March 2019 / Approved: 26 March 2019 / Online: 26 March 2019 (14:01:49 CET)

How to cite: Euler, T.; Franke, K.; Baden, T. Studying a Light Sensor with Light: Multiphoton Imaging in the Retina. Preprints 2019, 2019030244 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201903.0244.v1). Euler, T.; Franke, K.; Baden, T. Studying a Light Sensor with Light: Multiphoton Imaging in the Retina. Preprints 2019, 2019030244 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201903.0244.v1).

Abstract

Two-photon imaging of light stimulus-evoked neuronal activity has been used to study all neuron classes in the vertebrate retina, from the photoreceptors to the retinal ganglion cells. Clearly, the ability to study retinal circuits down to the level of single synapses or zoomed out at the level of complete populations of neurons, has been a major asset in our understanding of this beautiful circuit. In this chapter, we discuss the possibilities and pitfalls of using an all-optical approach in this highly light-sensitive part of the brain.

Subject Areas

vertebrate retina, mouse, zebrafish, two-photon microscopy, biosensor, activity probes, visual stimulus-evoked activity, laser-evoked retinal activity

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 10 May 2019
Commenter: Shinya Sato
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: Just a small point, p12 line 20 "as in vertebrates, the visual pigment is mainly regenerated in the PE [63]and, therefore, the continuous supply with restored visual pigment is ensured also in vitro". Visual pigment is an opsin protein bound with chromophore. What genereated in the pigment epithelium is 11-cis reitnal but not visual pigment itself. So it would be like "regenerated by the function of PE", "continuous supply with restored (11-cis-)chromophore".
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Response 1 to Comment 1
Received: 10 May 2019
Commenter: Thomas Euler
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: Thanks for the comment. You are correct, of course. We will clarify this in the proofs.

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