Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Spatially Resolved Soil Solution Chemistry in a Central European Atmospherically Polluted High-Elevation Catchment

Version 1 : Received: 14 February 2019 / Approved: 18 February 2019 / Online: 18 February 2019 (17:01:18 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Petrash, D. A., Buzek, F., Novak, M., Cejkova, B., Kram, P., Chuman, T., Curik, J., Veselovsky, F., Stepanova, M., Myska, O., Holeckova, P., and Bohdalkova, L.: Spatially resolved soil solution chemistry in a central European atmospherically polluted high-elevation catchment, SOIL, 5, 205-221, https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-5-205-2019, 2019. Petrash, D. A., Buzek, F., Novak, M., Cejkova, B., Kram, P., Chuman, T., Curik, J., Veselovsky, F., Stepanova, M., Myska, O., Holeckova, P., and Bohdalkova, L.: Spatially resolved soil solution chemistry in a central European atmospherically polluted high-elevation catchment, SOIL, 5, 205-221, https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-5-205-2019, 2019.

Journal reference: SOIL 2019, 5, 205-221
DOI: 10.5194/soil-5-205-2019

Abstract

Here we evaluate the chemistry of mineral soil solutions collected by suction lysimeters in a small mountain catchment that was affected by acidification-related spruce die-back. The aim was to obtain new insights into spatial patterns of nutrient partitioning during acidification recovery. This was achieved by comparing nutrient concentrations in soil solutions, collected along a V-shaped valley, with those in runoff. Five nests of suction lysimeters were installed in the 33-ha UDL catchment at different topographic positions (hilltops, slopes and valley). Following a 1-year equilibration, monthly samples of soil solutions were collected over a 2-year period. In the vicinity of each lysimeter nest, soil pits were excavated for a study of soil chemistry. Soil solutions were analyzed for SO42-, NO3-, DOC, NH4+, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and total dissolved Al concentrations, DOC and pH. For a P release estimation, ammonium oxalate extraction of soil samples was performed. Comparison of soil water data from this study with other European studies indicated that major environmentally relevant chemical species at UDL had concentrations similar to median concentrations across numerous previously acidified sites. CEC (≤ 58 meq kg-1) and BS (≤ 13 %), however, were significantly lower at UDL than at other European sites, documenting incomplete recovery from acidification. Spatial trends and seasonality in soil water chemistry support belowground inputs from mineral-stabilized legacy pollutants and soil nutrients. Seasonal variability of soil water sulfate and nitrate was significant. High nitrate in soil solutions during summer originated during the preceding dormant season, and high sulfate concentrations observed during the winter originating from recycled organic S during the summer. Higher concentrations of SO42-, NO3-, and base cations in runoff than in soil solutions may be explained by lateral surficial runoff leaching pollutants and nutrients from very shallow soil horizons. Nearly 30 years after peak acidification, solutions in mineral subsoil at UDL exhibited similar concentrations of SO42-, Ca2+ and Mg2+ as median values at the Pan-European International Co-operative Program (ICP) Forest sites, yet NO3- concentrations were an order of magnitude higher than the ICP sites. Calcium applied on soil surface by liming 32 to 11 years ago affected runoff more than soil solutions, suggesting contribution of both shallow soil water and groundwater to runoff.

Subject Areas

Anions of strong acids; Base cations; Entic podzol; Lysimeter • Small catchment; Soil solutions

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 1 August 2019
Commenter: Daniel Petráš
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: Published version available here

Petrash, D. A., Buzek, F., Novak, M., Cejkova, B., Kram, P., Chuman, T., Curik, J., Veselovsky, F., Stepanova, M., Myska, O., Holeckova, P., and Bohdalkova, L.: Spatially resolved soil solution chemistry in a central European atmospherically polluted high-elevation catchment, SOIL, 5, 205-221, https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-5-205-2019, 2019.
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