Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Post-Glacial Land Uplift Rate in Fennoscandia and Laurentia Determined by GRACE Data

Version 1 : Received: 24 January 2019 / Approved: 25 January 2019 / Online: 25 January 2019 (15:08:15 CET)

How to cite: Shafiei Joud, M.S.; Sjöberg, L.E.; Bagherbandi, M. Post-Glacial Land Uplift Rate in Fennoscandia and Laurentia Determined by GRACE Data. Preprints 2019, 2019010261 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201901.0261.v1). Shafiei Joud, M.S.; Sjöberg, L.E.; Bagherbandi, M. Post-Glacial Land Uplift Rate in Fennoscandia and Laurentia Determined by GRACE Data. Preprints 2019, 2019010261 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201901.0261.v1).

Abstract

The mantle mass flow interconnected with the process of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) and the reformation of the Earth’s crust constantly perturbs the observed gravity field towards a hypothetic isostatic state. We analyse the temporal changes of the gravity field from the GRACE data, using different mathematical and/or statistical methods to detect the GIA amidst other gravity signals. A number of gravimetric post-glacial land uplift rate (LUR) modelling methods are investigated and compared with the data from a total number of 515 GPS stations and preferred GIA forward models in Fennoscandia and North America. We investigate three mathematical methods, namely regression, principal component, and independent component analysis (ICA) to extracting the GIA signal from the GRACE monthly geoid heights. We use some regularization techniques to exploit the GRACE monthly data to their maximum spatial resolution and to increase the Signal to Noise Ratio of their short wavelengths. Near the centres of the study areas the gravimetric LUR model using the fast-ICA algorithm of Hyvärinen and Oja (2000) is shown to be in a complete agreement with the GPS data and the predictions of the GIA forward models, and for the whole areas, subject to epeirogeny movement of the two regions, their discrepancies reach to the extrema at -1.8 and +3.3, and -4.5 and +7.5 mm/a, respectively. We show that the largest discrepancies between the gravimetric model using the ICA method and the GIA forward model, occur for the sub-regions likely collocated with strong ice mass change signals.

Subject Areas

Glacial Isostatic Adjustment; gravimetric land uplift rate modelling; GRACE; independent component analysis

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