Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Pilot Feedback Electronic Imaging at Elevated Temperatures and its Potential for In-Process Electron Beam Melting Monitoring

Version 1 : Received: 9 January 2019 / Approved: 10 January 2019 / Online: 10 January 2019 (11:52:10 CET)

How to cite: Wong, H.; Neary, D.; Jones, E.; Fox, P.; Sutcliffe, C.. Pilot Feedback Electronic Imaging at Elevated Temperatures and its Potential for In-Process Electron Beam Melting Monitoring. Preprints 2019, 2019010098 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201901.0098.v1). Wong, H.; Neary, D.; Jones, E.; Fox, P.; Sutcliffe, C.. Pilot Feedback Electronic Imaging at Elevated Temperatures and its Potential for In-Process Electron Beam Melting Monitoring. Preprints 2019, 2019010098 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201901.0098.v1).

Abstract

Electron Beam Melting (EBM) is an increasingly used Additive Manufacturing (AM) technique employed by many industrial sectors, including the medical device and aerospace industries. The application of this technology is, however, challenged by the lack of process monitoring and control system that underpins process repeatability and part quality reproducibility. An electronic imaging system prototype has been developed to serve as an EBM monitoring technique, the capabilities of which have been verified at room temperature and at 320+10°C. Nevertheless, in order to fully assess the applicability of this technique, the image quality needs to be investigated at a range of elevated temperatures to fully understand the influence of thermal noise due to heat. In this paper, electronic imaging pilot trials at elevated temperatures, ranging from room temperature to , were carried out. Image quality measure Q of the digital electron images was evaluated, and the influence of temperature was investigated. In this study, raw electronic images generated at higher temperatures had greater Q values, i.e. better global image quality. It has been demonstrated that, for temperatures between , the influence of temperature on electronic image quality was not adversely affecting the visual clarity of image features. It is envisaged that the prototype has significant potential to contribute to in-process EBM monitoring in many manufacturing sectors. 

Subject Areas

Additive Manufacturing; Electron Beam Melting; In-Process Monitoring; Quality Control; Electronic Imaging

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