Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Global Need for Physical Rehabilitation: Systematic Analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017

Version 1 : Received: 4 January 2019 / Approved: 8 January 2019 / Online: 8 January 2019 (10:52:39 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Jesus, T.S.; Landry, M.D.; Hoenig, H. Global Need for Physical Rehabilitation: Systematic Analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 980. Jesus, T.S.; Landry, M.D.; Hoenig, H. Global Need for Physical Rehabilitation: Systematic Analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 980.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 980
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16060980

Abstract

Background: To inform global health policies and resources planning, this paper analyzes evolving trends in physical rehabilitation needs, using data on Years Lived with Disability (YLDs) from the Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD) 2017. Methods: Secondary analysis of how YLDs from conditions amenable to physical rehabilitation have evolved from 1990 to 2017, for the world and across countries of varying income levels. Linear regression analyses were used. Results: A 66.2% growth was found in estimated YLD Counts amenable to physical rehabilitation: a significant and linear growth of more than 5.1 billion YLDs per year (99%CI: 4.8–5.4; r2 = 0.99). Low-income countries more than doubled (111.5% growth) their YLD Counts amenable to physical rehabilitation since 1990. YLD Rates per 100,000 people and the percentage of YLDs amenable to physical rehabilitation also grew significantly over time, across locations (all p > 0.05). Finally, only in high-income countries Age-standardized YLD Rates significantly decreased (p < 0.01; r² = 0.86). Conclusions: Physical rehabilitation needs have been growing significantly in absolute, per-capita and in percentage of total YLDs, globally and across countries of varying income level. In absolute terms, growths were higher in lower income countries, wherein rehabilitation is under-resourced.

Subject Areas

rehabilitation; global health; disability; global burden of disease; health services needs and demand

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