Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

White Paper on the Biologization of Materials Research

Version 1 : Received: 24 December 2018 / Approved: 28 December 2018 / Online: 28 December 2018 (04:46:37 CET)

How to cite: Niemeyer, C.M.; Bastmeyer, M.; Bräse, S.; Lahann, J.; Woell, C. White Paper on the Biologization of Materials Research. Preprints 2018, 2018120329 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201812.0329.v1). Niemeyer, C.M.; Bastmeyer, M.; Bräse, S.; Lahann, J.; Woell, C. White Paper on the Biologization of Materials Research. Preprints 2018, 2018120329 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201812.0329.v1).

Abstract

The recommendations of the panel of experts on the further development of the ‘High-Tech Strategy’ of the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany designate the biologization of economic processes along with digitization as the central driver of societal change. Various fields such as the 'biologization of materials research' were then defined in the 'Bio-Agenda' in order to walk the path from biology to innovation. In view of this perspective, we describe how the use of biological materials and mechanisms can lead to resource conservation, the production of intelligent materials and new technological and medical applications. Our strategy, based on research on ‘Biointerfaces in Technology and Medicine’, aims at the development of modular biohybrid systems that could be used as 'biofactories of the future' for sustainable production processes. To achieve this goal, in a first phase already known technologies have to be further refined and integrated in order to obtain and apply compartmentalized reaction systems on different length and time scales. In a second phase, the resulting functional units will be employed to develop dissipative systems useful for biomedical applications and advanced production processes. From a technical point of view, future success in creating 'something entirely new' will depend crucially on robust and complementary research capabilities. Since the close connection of engineering and life sciences at KIT provides an excellent basis for this endeavor, we consider the above perspectives to be feasible.

Subject Areas

biomaterials; biofabrication; compartmentalization; materials research; microsystems; nanotechnology; self-assembly; self-organization

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.