Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

IUCN Red List of Ecosystems: Implications for Public Policy

Version 1 : Received: 10 December 2018 / Approved: 12 December 2018 / Online: 12 December 2018 (13:09:56 CET)

How to cite: Alaniz, A.; Perez-Quezada, J.F..; Galleguillos, M.; Vásquez, A.E..; Keith, D.A.. IUCN Red List of Ecosystems: Implications for Public Policy. Preprints 2018, 2018120150 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201812.0150.v1). Alaniz, A.; Perez-Quezada, J.F..; Galleguillos, M.; Vásquez, A.E..; Keith, D.A.. IUCN Red List of Ecosystems: Implications for Public Policy. Preprints 2018, 2018120150 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201812.0150.v1).

Abstract

Threats to natural ecosystems are closely linked to human development, and the lack, insufficiency or inefficiency of public policies are some of the most important drivers of negative effects on the environment. The contribution of the IUCN’s Red List of Ecosystems (RLE) to conservation topics has been discussed in previous studies; however, to date its implications for conservation in public policies have not been addressed. This perspective discusses how the RLE may support the improvement and development of these policies, specifically through the implications for public policy of each of the criteria that substantiate the threat status of ecosystems. We aim to provide a plausible baseline to the operationalization of RLE in public and conservation policy, facilitating the work of governments, practitioners and decision makers. Finally, we provide recommendations and examples as to how to proceed in creating and modifying different public policy instruments, such as land-use planning, spatial zoning, tax reduction, compensation schemes, climate change adaptation plans, management of introduced species, development offsets and restoration investment. This perspective contributes to implement RLE into public policy and to improve ecosystem conservation by expanding the current scope of RLE into practical and political dimensions through plausible actions, policies and strategies.

Subject Areas

Ecosystem conservation, Policy instruments, Conservation planning, Assessment criteria, land use planning, Threatened ecosystems, Prioritization

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