Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Impacts of the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems on Conservation Policy and Practice

Version 1 : Received: 7 December 2018 / Approved: 7 December 2018 / Online: 7 December 2018 (17:50:24 CET)

How to cite: Bland, L.M.; Nicholson, E..; Miller, R.M..; Andrade, A..; Etter, A.; Ferrer-Paris, J.R..; Kontula, T..; Lindgaard, A..; Pliscoff, P..; Skowno, A..; Zager, I..; Keith, D.A.. Impacts of the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems on Conservation Policy and Practice. Preprints 2018, 2018120097 Bland, L.M.; Nicholson, E..; Miller, R.M..; Andrade, A..; Etter, A.; Ferrer-Paris, J.R..; Kontula, T..; Lindgaard, A..; Pliscoff, P..; Skowno, A..; Zager, I..; Keith, D.A.. Impacts of the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems on Conservation Policy and Practice. Preprints 2018, 2018120097

Abstract

In 2014, the International Union for Conservation of Nature adopted the Red List of Ecosystems (IUCN RLE) criteria as the global standard for assessing risks to terrestrial, marine, and freshwater ecosystems. Identifying and quantifying the impacts of biodiversity assessments on the status of nature is key to justifying continued investment in assessments and enabling strategic planning to maximize future impact. In this policy perspective, we use an established impact evaluation framework to identify the impacts of the IUCN RLE since its inception. To date, 1,397 ecosystem units in 100 countries have been assessed following the IUCN RLE protocol. Systematic assessments are complete or underway in more than 25 countries and two continental regions (the Americas and Europe). Countries with established ecosystem red lists have already used them to inform legislation, land-use planning, protected area expansion, monitoring and reporting, and ecosystem management. IUCN RLE indices based on systematic assessments have high potential to inform global biodiversity reporting for the Aichi Targets and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Expanding the coverage of IUCN RLE assessments, building capacity to undertake them, and establishing stronger policy instruments to manage red-listed ecosystems will be key to maximizing conservation impacts over the coming decades.

Subject Areas

conservation practice, ecosystem, impact, IUCN Red List of Ecosystems, monitoring, risk assessment

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