Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Metamemory and Lineup Instructions: Asking Eyewitnesses to Recollect Reduces False Identification

Version 1 : Received: 30 November 2018 / Approved: 3 December 2018 / Online: 3 December 2018 (08:36:54 CET)

How to cite: Guerin, N.; Weber, N.; Horry, R. Metamemory and Lineup Instructions: Asking Eyewitnesses to Recollect Reduces False Identification. Preprints 2018, 2018120012 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201812.0012.v1). Guerin, N.; Weber, N.; Horry, R. Metamemory and Lineup Instructions: Asking Eyewitnesses to Recollect Reduces False Identification. Preprints 2018, 2018120012 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201812.0012.v1).

Abstract

Little theoretically-informed research investigates how non-standard eyewitness identification tasks or metacognitive instructions might improve identification accuracy. We used a continuous dual-process model of recognition to explain familiarity-based identification errors and design modified lineup tasks and metacognitive instructions that increased eyewitness recollection and discriminability. In four studies we examined identification performance across lineups (standard simultaneous, elimination, delayed-choice) and instructions (task-related, phenomenological, standard). Participants viewed photos of targets and made identification decisions about a lineup for each target. Instructions about memory phenomenology improved discriminability in delayed-choice lineups, while task-related instructions were ineffective. Metacognitive instructions about how to better evaluate memory quality in modified lineup tasks could improve recollection for greater identification accuracy even when memory is poor. While immediate post-decision confidence is a good predictor of identification accuracy, lineup modifications that improve eyewitness memory use would provide better evidence of suspect guilt or innocence. We discuss implications for lineup theory and design.

Subject Areas

eyewitness identification; feedback; recollection; metacognition; metamemory; recognition

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