Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Dutch Delta Resiliency by Societal Learning Introducing the Intertwined Process of Daily Practice and Theory Development

Version 1 : Received: 13 November 2018 / Approved: 16 November 2018 / Online: 16 November 2018 (09:07:23 CET)

How to cite: Sanders, F. Dutch Delta Resiliency by Societal Learning Introducing the Intertwined Process of Daily Practice and Theory Development. Preprints 2018, 2018110392 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201811.0392.v1). Sanders, F. Dutch Delta Resiliency by Societal Learning Introducing the Intertwined Process of Daily Practice and Theory Development. Preprints 2018, 2018110392 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201811.0392.v1).

Abstract

The Wester coastal Delta zone of the Netherlands is the relatively more crowded area of the country where ten of the seventeen million people live. The governmental prognosis is that this number of people will increase steadily in the coming decennia, unless the threat of climate-change seawater level rising. This is the picture in more Delta zones globally what makes the topic of resiliency for these delta-areas of importance. Approaches of resiliency are often dominated by governmental rescue planning and believe in technology solutions, while in the process the behaviour of people can make the difference in overcoming climate-change impact disasters. In the struggle against high water storming and flooding, the Dutch people prove this by developing societal resilient behaviour in a broad spectrum of activities. Post-PhD research on Dutch resilient behaviour in the in 1016-flooded Zaanstreek-Waterland area near the city of Amsterdam confirms that. Recently research by questionnaire among citizens in this region shows that people have favour for shared responsibility with government and related professional organizations. The Dutch examples of societal resiliency carried by people also show a action-learning perspective intertwined with governmental contingency planning. Therewith the Dutch practice shows a positive cross-fertilization of practice and knowledge development.

Subject Areas

water-resilience; climate-change; action-learning; resident-empowerment

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