Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Non-Clonal Chromosome Aberrations and Genome Chaos in Somatic And Germ Cells from Patients and Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma, Induced by Anticancer Treatment

Version 1 : Received: 9 November 2018 / Approved: 12 November 2018 / Online: 12 November 2018 (06:38:41 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Frias, S.; Ramos, S.; Salas, C.; Molina, B.; Sánchez, S.; Rivera-Luna, R. Nonclonal Chromosome Aberrations and Genome Chaos in Somatic and Germ Cells from Patients and Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma. Genes 2019, 10, 37. Frias, S.; Ramos, S.; Salas, C.; Molina, B.; Sánchez, S.; Rivera-Luna, R. Nonclonal Chromosome Aberrations and Genome Chaos in Somatic and Germ Cells from Patients and Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma. Genes 2019, 10, 37.

Journal reference: Genes 2019, 10, 37
DOI: 10.3390/genes10010037

Abstract

Anticancer regimens for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients include highly genotoxic drugs that have been very successful in killing tumor cells and providing a 90% disease-free survival at five years. However, these treatments do not have a specific cell target, damaging both cancerous and normal cells. Thus, HL survivors have a high risk of developing new primary cancers, both hematologic and solid tumors, that have been related to treatment. Several studies have shown that after-treatment, HL patients and survivors present persistent chromosomal instability, including non-clonal chromosomal aberrations. The frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities appear to depend on the type of therapy and the cell type examined. For example, MOPP chemotherapy affects hematopoietic and germ stem cells leading to long-term genotoxic effects and azoospermia, while ABVD chemotherapy affects transiently sperm cells, with most of the patients showing recovery of spermatogenesis. Both regimens have long-term effects in somatic cells, presenting non-clonal chromosomal aberrations and genomic chaos in a fraction of non-cancerous cells. This is a source of karyotypic heterogeneity that could eventually generate a more stable population acquiring clonal chromosomal aberrations and leading towards the development of a new cancer. 

Subject Areas

chromosome instability (CIN); chromoplexy; genome chaos; chromosomal heterogeneity; karyotype heterogeneity; non-clonal chromosome aberration (NCCA); second cancer

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.