Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Morbi-Mortality of the Victims of Internal Conflict and Poor Population in The Risaralda Province, Colombia

Version 1 : Received: 31 October 2018 / Approved: 2 November 2018 / Online: 2 November 2018 (05:11:13 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Rentería-Ramos, R.; Hurtado-Heredia, R.; Urdinola, B.P. Morbi-Mortality of the Victims of Internal Conflict and Poor Population in the Risaralda Province, Colombia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1644. Rentería-Ramos, R.; Hurtado-Heredia, R.; Urdinola, B.P. Morbi-Mortality of the Victims of Internal Conflict and Poor Population in the Risaralda Province, Colombia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1644.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1644
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16091644

Abstract

Health differences across socioeconomic strata have always pointed out that poorer and minorities have higher mortality and morbidity than richer and majorities. This difference is exacerbated for particular populations such as the victims of ongoing armed conflicts, who are also much harder to quantify due to the conflict itself. This study applies network analysis to a combination of three large administrative records for the health system and mortality records in the province of Risaralda (Colombia) between 2011 and 2016. It produces the most common causes of morbi-mortality for both victims of violence and the poorest inhabitants of Risaralda, defined as those who qualify as recipients of subsidies from the Colombian welfare program called SISBEN in the categories of highest need. Both populations show high morbidity frequencies for non-communicable diseases such as Type II diabetes, hypertension, and hyperglyceridaemia, mostly associated with exposure to unhealthy lifestyles. Additionally, the mortality outcomes reflect the different lifestyles and medical treatments of both subpopulations. While the poorest replicate the same causes identified for morbidity, the victims of armed conflict die of additional causes including Type II diabetes, which reflects the even worse conditions they face.

Subject Areas

morbidity; mortality; network analysis; victims of internal conflict

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