Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

A Microethnographic and Ethnobotanical Approach to Llayta Consumption among the Andes Feeding Practices

Version 1 : Received: 29 October 2018 / Approved: 30 October 2018 / Online: 30 October 2018 (04:43:02 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Rivera, M.; Galetović, A.; Licuime, R.; Gómez-Silva, B. A Microethnographic and Ethnobotanical Approach to Llayta Consumption Among Andes Feeding Practices. Foods 2018, 7, 202. Rivera, M.; Galetović, A.; Licuime, R.; Gómez-Silva, B. A Microethnographic and Ethnobotanical Approach to Llayta Consumption Among Andes Feeding Practices. Foods 2018, 7, 202.

Journal reference: Foods 2018, 7, 202
DOI: 10.3390/foods7120202

Abstract

Llayta is a dietary supplement used by rural communities in Perú and northern Chile since pre-Columbian days. Llayta is the biomass of colonies of a Nostoc cyanobacterium grown in wetlands of the Andean highlands, harvested, sun-dried and sold as an ingredient for human consumption. The biomass has a substantial content of essential amino acids (58% of total amino acids) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (33% total fatty acids). This ancestral practice is being loss and the causes were investigated by an ethnographic approach to register the social representations of Llayta, to document how this Andean feeding practice is perceived and how much the community knows about Llayta. Only 37% of the participants (mostly adults) have had a direct experience with Llayta; other participants (mostly children) did not have any knowledge about it. These social responses reflect anthropological and cultural tensions associated to lack of knowledge on Andean algae, sites where to find Llayta, where it is commercialized, how it is cooked and on its nutritional benefits. The loss of this ancestral feeding practice, mostly on northern Chile, is probably associated to cultural changes, migration of the rural communities, and a very limited access to the available information. We propose that Llayta consumption can be revitalized by developing appropriate educational strategies and investigating potential new food derivatives based on the biomass from the isolated Llayta cyanobacterium.

Subject Areas

Andean microalgae consumption; Atacama; cyanobacteria; Llayta; microethnography; Nostoc

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