Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Expert-Based Speed-Precision Control in Early Simulator Training for Novice Surgeons

Version 1 : Received: 14 October 2018 / Approved: 17 October 2018 / Online: 17 October 2018 (08:40:08 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Dresp-Langley, B. Towards Expert-Based Speed–Precision Control in Early Simulator Training for Novice Surgeons. Information 2018, 9, 316. Dresp-Langley, B. Towards Expert-Based Speed–Precision Control in Early Simulator Training for Novice Surgeons. Information 2018, 9, 316.

Journal reference: Information 2018, 9, 316
DOI: 10.3390/info9120316

Abstract

Simulator training for image-guided surgical interventions may benefit from artificial intelligence systems that control the evolution of task skills in terms of time and precision of a trainee's performance on the basis of fully automatic feed-back systems. At the earliest stages of training, novice trainees frequently focus on getting faster at the task, and may thereby compromise the optimal evolution of the precision of their performance. For automatically guiding them towards attaining an optimal speed-accuracy trade-off, an effective control system for the reinforcement/correction of strategies must be able to exploit the right individual performance criteria in the right way, reliably detect individual performance trends at any given moment in time, and alert the trainee, as early as necessary, when to slow down and focus on precision, or when to focus on getting faster. This article addresses several aspects of this challenge for speed-accuracy controlled simulator training before any training on specific surgical tasks or clinical models should be envisaged. Analyses of individual learning curves from the simulator training sessions of novices and benchmark performance data of one expert surgeon, who had no specific training in the simulator task, validate the suggested approach.

Subject Areas

surgical simulator training; individual performance trend; speed-accuracy function; automatic detection; performance feed-back

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