Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Screening for Viral Hepatitis and Other Infectious Diseases in a High-Risk Health Care Group in Mexico

Version 1 : Received: 10 October 2018 / Approved: 10 October 2018 / Online: 10 October 2018 (05:21:20 CEST)

How to cite: Ramírez-Pérez, O.L.; Cruz-Ramon, V.C..; Chinchilla-López, P.; Baptista-González, H.; Trueba-Gómez, R.; Rosenfeld-Mann, F.; Roque-Álvarez, E.; Aguilar-Olivos, N.E.; Ponciano-Rodriguez, G.; Coronel-Castillo, C.E.; Contreras-Carmona, J.; Méndez-Sánchez, N. Screening for Viral Hepatitis and Other Infectious Diseases in a High-Risk Health Care Group in Mexico. Preprints 2018, 2018100201 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201810.0201.v1). Ramírez-Pérez, O.L.; Cruz-Ramon, V.C..; Chinchilla-López, P.; Baptista-González, H.; Trueba-Gómez, R.; Rosenfeld-Mann, F.; Roque-Álvarez, E.; Aguilar-Olivos, N.E.; Ponciano-Rodriguez, G.; Coronel-Castillo, C.E.; Contreras-Carmona, J.; Méndez-Sánchez, N. Screening for Viral Hepatitis and Other Infectious Diseases in a High-Risk Health Care Group in Mexico. Preprints 2018, 2018100201 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201810.0201.v1).

Abstract

Health care workers (HCWs), specifically dentists, are at the front line for acquiring blood-borne virus infections. The highest proportion of occupational transmission is through percutaneous injuries via hollow-bore needles. Several studies around the world have reported that hepatitis viruses and human immunodeficiency virus are the main pathogens for most cases of occupationally acquired blood-borne infection. We aim to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis E virus (HEV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among Mexican dentists. Methods. We included 159 dentists who attended the annual meeting at the Medica Sur Clinic & Foundation held in Mexico City in May 2016. A survey was applied in order to obtain data of occupational exposure to blood-borne viruses (BBV). Serum samples were screened serologically using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results. Two dentists (1.2%) were positive for antibodies against HCV antigen, one (0.6%) was positive for antibodies against HBV antigen and three (1.8%) were positive for the detection of IgG antibodies against HEV. Two cases (1.2%) were positive for antibodies against HIV. Conclusions. The infection by HEV was the most prevalent among dentists. However, the prevalence of BBV in dentists was similar to that in the general population.

Subject Areas

hepatitis c viruses; hepatitis e virus; dentists

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