Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Understanding the Demographic Predictors and Association of Comorbidities in Hospitalized Children with Conduct Disorder

Version 1 : Received: 17 August 2018 / Approved: 21 August 2018 / Online: 21 August 2018 (06:32:21 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Patel, R.S.; Amaravadi, N.; Bhullar, H.; Lekireddy, J.; Win, H. Understanding the Demographic Predictors and Associated Comorbidities in Children Hospitalized with Conduct Disorder. Behav. Sci. 2018, 8, 80. Patel, R.S.; Amaravadi, N.; Bhullar, H.; Lekireddy, J.; Win, H. Understanding the Demographic Predictors and Associated Comorbidities in Children Hospitalized with Conduct Disorder. Behav. Sci. 2018, 8, 80.

Journal reference: Behav. Sci. 2018, 8, 80
DOI: 10.3390/bs8090080

Abstract

Objective: To determine demographic predictors and comorbidities in hospitalized children with conduct disorder. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2012–2014). All patients were ≤18 years and cases with primary diagnosis of conduct disorder (N = 32345) and a comparison group with another psychiatric diagnosis (N = 410,479) were identified using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. A logistic regression model was used to generate the Odds Ratio (OR) between both groups. Results: Children <11 years old have five times greater chances of admission for conduct disorder than adolescent (OR 5.339). African American males are more likely to be admitted for conduct disorder. Children with conduct disorder from low-income families have a 1.5 times higher likelihood for inpatient admission compared to high-income families. These children have about eleven times higher odds of comorbid psychosis (OR 11.810) and seven times for depression (OR 7.093) compared to the comparison group. Conclusion: Conduct disorders are more debilitating for children and families than many providers realize. African American male under 11 years is at the highest risk for inpatient management for conduct disorder. These patients have a higher risk of comorbid psychosis and depression which may further deteriorate the severity of illness and require acute inpatient care.

Subject Areas

conduct disorder; comorbidities; schizophrenia; demographics; child; behaviour; child psychiatry

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