Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Staphylococcus Aureus Isolated from Meat Carcasses and Bovine Milk in Abattoirs and Dairy Farms of the Eastern Cape, South Africa

Version 1 : Received: 15 August 2018 / Approved: 15 August 2018 / Online: 15 August 2018 (13:58:11 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Pekana, A.; Green, E. Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Meat Carcasses and Bovine Milk in Abattoirs and Dairy Farms of the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2223. Pekana, A.; Green, E. Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Meat Carcasses and Bovine Milk in Abattoirs and Dairy Farms of the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2223.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2223
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph15102223

Abstract

Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) occasionally threatens the life of the host as a persistent pathogen even though it is normal flora of humans and animals. We characterized drug resistance in S. aureus isolated from animal carcasses and milk samples from the abattoirs and dairy farms in the Eastern Cape Province. Methods: A 1000 meat swab samples and 200 raw milk samples were collected from selected abattoirs and dairy farms in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. S. aureus was isolated and positively identified using biochemical tests and confirmed by molecular methods. Antibiotic susceptibility test against 14 different antibiotics was performed against all isolates. Antibiotic resistance genes were also detected. Results: Of the 1200 samples collected, 134 (11.2%) samples were positive for S. aureus. Resistance ranged from 71.6% for penicillin G to 39.2% for tetracycline. Resistance gene (blaZ) was detected in 13 (14.9%), while msrA was found in 31 (52.5%) of S. aureus isolates. Conclusions: The present result shows the potential dissemination of multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains in the dairy farms and abattoirs in the Eastern Cape. Therefore, this implies that the organism may rapidly spread through food and pose serious public health risk

Subject Areas

Staphylococcus aureus, meat, raw milk, antibiotics; antibiotic resistance genes

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Comment 1
Received: 16 August 2018
Commenter: Brenda Mills
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: The article shows results most scientists think are obvious, however, without reporting those obvious results, we wont be able to fight against the scourge we are facing.
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