Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Recycling and Reuse Technology: Waste to Wealth Initiative in a Private Tertiary Institution, Nigeria

Version 1 : Received: 5 August 2018 / Approved: 6 August 2018 / Online: 6 August 2018 (09:44:57 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Olukanni, D.O.; Aipoh, A.O.; Kalabo, I.H. Recycling and Reuse Technology: Waste to Wealth Initiative in a Private Tertiary Institution, Nigeria. Recycling 2018, 3, 44. Olukanni, D.O.; Aipoh, A.O.; Kalabo, I.H. Recycling and Reuse Technology: Waste to Wealth Initiative in a Private Tertiary Institution, Nigeria. Recycling 2018, 3, 44.

Journal reference: Recycling 2018, 3, 44
DOI: 10.3390/recycling3030044

Abstract

The practice of collecting, treating and management of solid waste prior to disposal has become a necessity in developing and modern societies. Over the years, it is known that most wastes that are disposed have a second hand value. However, the construction cost for conventional Material Recovery Facility(s) (MRFs) has been a major barrier for implementation. These technologies require considerable technical expertise, which is often not available in developing nations to successfully operate the MRFs. Covenant University; a private mission institution through her waste to wealth scheme is focused on managing and processing used materials to reusable products. These include Pet bottles, Paper wastes, Food wastes from cafeteria, plastic food packs, nylon, tin cans and others. Specific areas chosen for the Survey include the residential areas for staff and students and the two cafeterias. The waste generated was characterized based on the waste stream so as to quantify the amount of recyclable waste generated and most occurring. The survey involved the use of structured questionnaires, on-site observations and measurements. The study reveals an average amount of recyclable waste generated per day in the institution as 13.46% pet bottles, 4.03% paper, 55.56% food waste, 12.64% plastic, 9.63% nylon and 4.68% tin cans. The study established that adequate waste characterization is a requirement for effective integrated solid waste management which would boost resource recovery, reuse and recycling.

Subject Areas

Municipal Solid Waste; Waste Management, Sustainable Technology, Recycling, Reuse, Waste to wealth

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