Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Gamification Concepts to Promote and Maintain Therapy Adherence in Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency

Version 1 : Received: 25 July 2018 / Approved: 26 July 2018 / Online: 26 July 2018 (04:41:50 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Radovick, S.; Hershkovitz, E.; Kalisvaart, A.; Koning, M.; Paridaens, K.; Kamel Boulos, M.N. Gamification Concepts to Promote and Maintain Therapy Adherence in Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency
. J 2018, 1, 71-80. Radovick, S.; Hershkovitz, E.; Kalisvaart, A.; Koning, M.; Paridaens, K.; Kamel Boulos, M.N. Gamification Concepts to Promote and Maintain Therapy Adherence in Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency. J 2018, 1, 71-80.

Journal reference: J 2018, 1, 8
DOI: 10.3390/j1010008

Abstract

Growth hormone (GH) deficiency affects up to 1 in 4,000 children and is usually treated with daily injections of GH whilst the child is still growing. With children typically diagnosed around 5 years old, this can mean over 10 years of therapy, which can place a considerable burden on the child and parent. Over three-quarters of children are estimated to be not fully compliant with therapy, which can compromise their chances of attaining their target height. In recent years, interactive mobile health (smart phone or tablet) interventions using game-like concepts, so called ‘gamification’, have increased in popularity and have demonstrated success in promoting positive self-management behaviour in children with chronic conditions, such as diabetes. The application of gamified interventions has the potential to support adherence to therapy and positive behaviour in children with GH deficiency in a number of ways: 1) By providing education in a format that the child understands and accepts (e.g. using behavioural constructs to facilitate explaining why adherence is important); 2) By providing a mechanism to reduce the anxiety and stress associated with administering the injection (e.g. diversion with a virtual pet); and 3) By providing feedback to encourage on-going engagement (e.g. rewards, progression through levels).

Subject Areas

app; somatotropin; serious games; gamification; digital; mobile health

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