Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Biases Inherent in Studies of Coffee Consumption in Early Pregnancy and the Risks of Subsequent Events

Version 1 : Received: 24 July 2018 / Approved: 25 July 2018 / Online: 25 July 2018 (05:57:48 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Leviton, A. Biases Inherent in Studies of Coffee Consumption in Early Pregnancy and the Risks of Subsequent Events. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1152. Leviton, A. Biases Inherent in Studies of Coffee Consumption in Early Pregnancy and the Risks of Subsequent Events. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1152.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2018, 10, 1152
DOI: 10.3390/nu10091152

Abstract

Consumption of coffee by women early in their pregnancy has been viewed as potentially increasing the risk of miscarriage, low birth weight, and childhood leukemias. Many of these reports of epidemiologic studies have not acknowledged the potential biases inherent in studying the relationship between early-pregnancy-coffee consumption and subsequent events. I discuss five of these biases, recall bias, misclassification, residual confounding, reverse causation, and publication bias. Each might account for claims that attribute adversities to early-pregnancy-coffee consumption. To what extent these biases can be avoided remains to be determined. At a minimum, they need to be acknowledged wherever they might account for what is reported.

Subject Areas

caffeine; coffee; epidemiology; recall bias; misclassification; residual confounding; reverse causation; publication bias

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