Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Remote Sensing Based and Participatory Analysis of Land Degradation and Potential Land Conservation Measures in Kloto District (Togo, West Africa)

Version 1 : Received: 15 May 2018 / Approved: 16 May 2018 / Online: 16 May 2018 (08:40:46 CEST)

How to cite: Koglo, Y.S.; Agyare, W.A.; Diwediga, B.; Sogbedji, J.M.; Adden, A.K.; Gaiser, T. Remote Sensing Based and Participatory Analysis of Land Degradation and Potential Land Conservation Measures in Kloto District (Togo, West Africa). Preprints 2018, 2018050226 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201805.0226.v1). Koglo, Y.S.; Agyare, W.A.; Diwediga, B.; Sogbedji, J.M.; Adden, A.K.; Gaiser, T. Remote Sensing Based and Participatory Analysis of Land Degradation and Potential Land Conservation Measures in Kloto District (Togo, West Africa). Preprints 2018, 2018050226 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201805.0226.v1).

Abstract

This study investigates proximate drivers of cropland and forest degradation in Kloto district (Togo, West Africa) as, way of, exploring integrated sustainable landscape approaches in respect to socio-economic and environmental needs and requirements. Net change analysis of major cash and food crops based on three time steps Landsat data (1985–2002, 2002–2017 and 1985–2017) and quantitative analysis from participatory survey data with farmers and landowners are used. Study underlines poor agricultural systems and cassava farming as major impediments to alarming forest losses between 1985–2017. Significant net loss in forests cover by 23.6% and surface areas under cultivation of cocoa agroforestry and maize by 12.99 and 10.1% from 1985 to 2017, due to, intensive cassava cropping (38.78%) and settlement expansions (7.84%). Meanwhile, loss in forest cover between 2017 and 2002 was marginal (8.36%) compared to the period 1985–2002 for which the loss was considerable (15.24%). Based on participatory surveys, majority of agricultural lands are threatened by erosion or physical deterioration (67.5%), land degradation or salt deposits and loss of micro/macro fauna and flora at 56.7%, declining in soil fertility (32.5%), soil water holding capacity (11.7%) and changes in soil texture (3.3%). Majority of farmers adhere to the adoption of the proposed climate smart practices with emphasis on cost effective drip irrigation systems (45.83%), soil mulching (35%) and adoption of drought resilient varieties (29.17%) to anticipate drought spells adverse. The study concludes that low adoption of improved soil conservation, integrated water management and harvesting systems and low productive and adaptive cultivars entail extreme degradation of croplands and crops productivity decline. Therefore, farmers are forced to clear more forests in search of stable and healthy soils for production and extraction of forest products to meet their food demands and improve their livelihoods conditions. Capacity building on integrated pathways of soil and land management practices are therefore needed to ensure sustainable and viable socio-ecological systems at local scale.

Subject Areas

land degradation; food security; climate change; remote sensing; survey datasets; Kloto district

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