Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Understanding Intersectionality and Resiliency among Transgender Adolescents: Exploring Pathways among Peer Victimization, School Belonging, and Drug Use

Version 1 : Received: 20 April 2018 / Approved: 26 April 2018 / Online: 26 April 2018 (04:47:30 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Hatchel, T.; Marx, R. Understanding Intersectionality and Resiliency among Transgender Adolescents: Exploring Pathways among Peer Victimization, School Belonging, and Drug Use. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1289. Hatchel, T.; Marx, R. Understanding Intersectionality and Resiliency among Transgender Adolescents: Exploring Pathways among Peer Victimization, School Belonging, and Drug Use. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1289.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1289
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph15061289

Abstract

Transgender youth experience elevated levels of victimization and may therefore report greater drug use than their cisgender peers, yet little is known about protective factors like school belonging that may mediate this relationship. Further, scant research has explored the experiences of youth at the intersection of transgender identity and youth of color status or low socioeconomic status, especially with respect to these multiple minority statuses’ associations with peer victimization, drug use, and school belonging. Using data from the California Healthy Kids Survey, the current study employs structural equation modeling to explore the relationships among school belonging, peer victimization, and drug use for transgender youth. Findings indicate that school belonging does mediate the pathway between peer victimization and drug use for transgender youth and that although youth of color experience greater victimization, they do not engage in greater drug use than their white transgender peers. Based on these results, those concerned with the healthy futures of transgender youth should advocate for more open and affirming school climates that engender a sense of belonging and treat transgender youth with dignity and fairness.

Subject Areas

school connectedness; substance abuse; LGBTQ youth; bullying

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