Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Role of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation as a Diagnostic Tool for Multiple Sclerosis

Version 1 : Received: 2 April 2018 / Approved: 2 April 2018 / Online: 2 April 2018 (16:03:29 CEST)

How to cite: Bashir, S.; M. Alsharidah, M.; S.Alseneidi, S.; A. Alkharan, A.; Hamza, A. The Role of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation as a Diagnostic Tool for Multiple Sclerosis. Preprints 2018, 2018040026 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201804.0026.v1). Bashir, S.; M. Alsharidah, M.; S.Alseneidi, S.; A. Alkharan, A.; Hamza, A. The Role of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation as a Diagnostic Tool for Multiple Sclerosis. Preprints 2018, 2018040026 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201804.0026.v1).

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated, chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), characterized by demyelination, axonal degeneration, and cognitive impairment. It also has an important impact on the quality of life of patients and their family members. An estimated 2,500,000 people in the world have multiple sclerosis. Neurophysiological parameters, like sensitivity to demyelination and the strength of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic interactions in the cerebral cortex, can be identified through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS). These parameters can be valid and objective parameters that can be correlated with the progression of MS, and can provide reliable indices for the severity of illness and the efficacy of drugs used to treat it. The discovery of specific and detailed neurophysiological parameters as surrogate end points for disease activity could represent an important step in clinical trials. Changes in cortical connectivity have already been demonstrated in MS, but in clinical practice, other measures are usually used to evaluate disease activity. We speculate that TMS may be more effective in identifying disease progression that leads to long-term disability, compared to standard surrogate markers, due to the fact that it represents a direct measure of synaptic transmission(s) in MS.

Subject Areas

MS: Multiple sclerosis, TMS: transcranial magnetic stimulation, Evoked Potentials;

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