Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Self-Reported Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Avoidance Compared with Cotinine Confirmed Tobacco Smoke Exposure among Pregnant Women and Their Infants

Version 1 : Received: 29 March 2018 / Approved: 30 March 2018 / Online: 30 March 2018 (09:51:09 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Gavarkovs, A.G.; Risica, P.M.; Parker, D.R.; Jennings, E.; Mello, J.; Phipps, M. Self-Reported Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Avoidance Compared with Cotinine Confirmed Tobacco Smoke Exposure among Pregnant Women and Their Infants. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 871. Gavarkovs, A.G.; Risica, P.M.; Parker, D.R.; Jennings, E.; Mello, J.; Phipps, M. Self-Reported Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Avoidance Compared with Cotinine Confirmed Tobacco Smoke Exposure among Pregnant Women and Their Infants. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 871.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 871
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph15050871

Abstract

Background: Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) presents substantial health risks for pregnant women and newborn infants. Measurements of ETS include invasive and expensive biochemical tests as well as less invasive and lower-cost self-reported exposure and avoidance measures. Better understanding of self-report measures will help to select ETS assessments for evaluation. Methods: This analysis was conducted within the context of a tailored video intervention to reduce tobacco smoking and ETS exposure during pregnancy and after delivery, in the control group sample of 147 nonsmoking women. Measurements of salivary cotinine concentration, self-reported ETS exposure and avoidance behaviors were captured at 32 weeks gestation and 6 months postpartum. Results: Salivary cotinine concentration was significantly related to ETS avoidance among pregnant nonsmokers at 32 weeks gestation, but not ETS exposure. At 6 months postpartum, both the reported ETS exposure of the infant and maternal avoidance behaviors to reduce her infant’s exposure were associated with the infant’s salivary cotinine concentration. At 32 weeks gestation and 6 months postpartum, avoidance behaviors decreased as exposure increased. Discussion: This study suggests that for nonsmoking women during pregnancy, report of tobacco smoke avoidance is more valid than report of exposure. After delivery, self-reported ETS exposure or avoidance are associated with each other and biochemical measurement of salivary cotinine. These results provide researchers and clinicians with evidence to support inclusion of avoidance behaviors in the selection of ETS measure.

Subject Areas

environmental tobacco exposure; pregnancy; infancy; measurement

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