Preprint Article Version 1 This version not peer reviewed

Comparison of Anthocyanin and Polyphenolics in Purple Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) Grown in Different Locations in Japan

Version 1 : Received: 24 December 2017 / Approved: 25 December 2017 / Online: 25 December 2017 (10:01:14 CET)

How to cite: Ishiguro, K.; Kuranouchi, T.; Kai, Y.; Katayama, K. Comparison of Anthocyanin and Polyphenolics in Purple Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) Grown in Different Locations in Japan. Preprints 2017, 2017120176 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201712.0176.v1). Ishiguro, K.; Kuranouchi, T.; Kai, Y.; Katayama, K. Comparison of Anthocyanin and Polyphenolics in Purple Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) Grown in Different Locations in Japan. Preprints 2017, 2017120176 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201712.0176.v1).

Abstract

The health benefits of purple sweetpotato, which is used as an edible food in its natural state and in processed foods and as a natural color pigment, have been recognized. In Japan, sweetpotato has been economically produced in regions below 36°4′N latitude, however, cultivation areas are beginning to expand further north. The anthocyanin and polyphenolics in purple sweetpotatoes cultivated in different locations; I (42°92′ N, 143°04′ E), II (35°99′ N, 140°01′ E), and III (31°72′ N, 131°03′ E), were compared over two years. Total anthocyanin and polyphenolic contents in purple sweetpotatoes tended to be high in location I. Their contents significantly differed over the two years in locations I and III and was dependent on temperature during cultivation. The anthocyanin and polyphenolic compositions differed between locations. The peonidin/cyanidin ratios were higher in location III compared with I and II in all varieties. The relative amount of chlorogenic acid was higher in location I, while the amount of 3,4- and 4,5-dicaffeoyolquinic acids were higher in location III, suggesting that the variability of the anthocyanin and polyphenolic content and composition was dependent on cultivation conditions. This study suggested that northern areas in Japan are an alternative production area and may yield higher amounts of anthocyanin and polyphenolics.

Subject Areas

purple sweetpotato; anthocyanin; polyphenolics; caffeoylquinic acid; temperature

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