Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Soft Drink Raises Plasma Uric Acid in Comparison to Fruit: Results from a Four-Week, Randomized Controlled Trial

Version 1 : Received: 18 December 2017 / Approved: 18 December 2017 / Online: 18 December 2017 (14:18:33 CET)

How to cite: Mallard, S.R.; Te Morenga, L. Soft Drink Raises Plasma Uric Acid in Comparison to Fruit: Results from a Four-Week, Randomized Controlled Trial. Preprints 2017, 2017120125 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201712.0125.v1). Mallard, S.R.; Te Morenga, L. Soft Drink Raises Plasma Uric Acid in Comparison to Fruit: Results from a Four-Week, Randomized Controlled Trial. Preprints 2017, 2017120125 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201712.0125.v1).

Abstract

High fructose and sugar-sweetened soft drink (SSSD) intakes are associated with elevated blood uric acid concentrations and increased risk of gout and cardiovascular disease. Fruits are naturally high in fructose but their effect on cardiometabolic risk is unknown. We examined the effect on serum uric acid and cardiometabolic risk factors of consuming fructose from either fruit or SSSD in overweight adults. 48 healthy, overweight (BMI≥ 28 kg/m2) men (n=21) and women (n=20) were randomised to either a fruit (n = 19) or SSSSD (n = 22) intervention for 4 weeks. The fruit group received 6 items of fresh and dried fruit per day and the SSSD group received 955ml of SSSD per day with treatments matched for energy and fructose content. Serum uric acid concentrations were significantly reduced in men in the fruit group compared to the SSSD group (difference 57.2 μmol/L [95% CI: 16.4, 98.0], p= 0.008) but there was no difference amongst women (1.3 μmol/L [95%CI: -9.5, 6.9], p= 0.295). There differences in weight change or other cardiometabolic risk factors. These findings suggest no need to restrict fruit intake in individuals with elevated serum uric acid concentrations, such as those with gout.

Subject Areas

urate; uric acid; cardiometabolic risk; fruit; sugar; sugar-sweetened soft drink; sugar-sweetened; beverage; dietary intake; dietary intervention; gout

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