Preprint Article Version 1 This version not peer reviewed

Crisis Resource Management in the Delivery Room. Development of Behavioral Markers for Team Performance in Emergency Simulation

Version 1 : Received: 14 December 2017 / Approved: 15 December 2017 / Online: 15 December 2017 (08:54:25 CET)

How to cite: Bracco, F.; De Tonetti, G.; Masini, M.; Geretto, F.; Celleno, D. Crisis Resource Management in the Delivery Room. Development of Behavioral Markers for Team Performance in Emergency Simulation. Preprints 2017, 2017120103 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201712.0103.v1). Bracco, F.; De Tonetti, G.; Masini, M.; Geretto, F.; Celleno, D. Crisis Resource Management in the Delivery Room. Development of Behavioral Markers for Team Performance in Emergency Simulation. Preprints 2017, 2017120103 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201712.0103.v1).

Abstract

Human factors are the most relevant issues contributing to adverse events in obstetrics. Specific training of Crisis Resource Management (CRM) skills (i.e., problem solving and team management, resource allocation, awareness of environment, and dynamic decision-making) are now widespread and are often based on High Fidelity Simulation. In order to be used as a guideline in simulated scenarios, they need to be translated into specific and observable behavioral markers. To this purpose, we developed a set of observable behaviors related to the main elements of CRM in the delivery room. The observational tool was then adopted in a two-days seminar on obstetric hemorrhage where teams working in obstetric wards of six Italian hospitals took part to simulations. The tool was used as guide for the Io and as a peer-to-peer feedback. It was then rated for its usefulness in facilitating the reflection upon one’s own behavior, its ease of use, and its usefulness for the peer-to-peer feedback. The ratings were highly positive, around 4 in a 5-point scale. The CRM observational tool is therefore a useful, quick and easy solution to facilitate the debriefing, the peer-to-peer feedback and, most of all, the transfer of safe behavior from simulation to everyday practice.      

Subject Areas

Crisis Resource Management; obstetric hemorrhage; non-technical skills; High Fidelity Simulation; delivery room

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