Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Socioeconomic Indicators of Bamboo Use for Agroforestry Development in the Dry Semi-Deciduous Forest Zone of Ghana

Version 1 : Received: 7 November 2017 / Approved: 7 November 2017 / Online: 7 November 2017 (04:06:23 CET)

How to cite: Akoto, D.S.; Denich, M.; Partey, S.T.; Oliver, F.; Kwaku, M.; A. Mensah, A. Socioeconomic Indicators of Bamboo Use for Agroforestry Development in the Dry Semi-Deciduous Forest Zone of Ghana . Preprints 2017, 2017110045 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201711.0045.v1). Akoto, D.S.; Denich, M.; Partey, S.T.; Oliver, F.; Kwaku, M.; A. Mensah, A. Socioeconomic Indicators of Bamboo Use for Agroforestry Development in the Dry Semi-Deciduous Forest Zone of Ghana . Preprints 2017, 2017110045 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201711.0045.v1).

Abstract

Bamboo agroforestry is currently being promoted as a viable land use option to reduce dependence on natural forest for wood fuels in Ghana. To align the design and introduction of bamboo agroforestry in conformity with farmers’ needs, perceptions, skills and local cultural practices, information on its acceptability and adoption potential among farmers is necessary. It is therefore the objective of this study to (1) describe bamboo ethnobotany and (2) assess socioeconomic factors that affect the acceptability and adoption of bamboo and its integration into farming practices. Accordingly, information has been collected from 200 farmers in the dry semi-deciduous forest zone of Ghana. The study identified the socioeconomic risks and uncertainties as well as biophysical factors that are likely to influence the potential adoption of bamboo agroforestry in the study region. Gender, age, farmers’ known uses of bamboo, the practice of leaving trees on farmlands, farmers’ networking and access to extension services, land availability and ownership by farmers were identified as suitable predictor variables for the adoption of bamboo agroforestry. It is envisaged that bamboo agroforestry is a good bet in the DSFZ though there is the need to explore domestic energy (fuelwood) provision and substitution potential in order to have a broader picture of the technology.

Subject Areas

adoption; land-use; degradation; ethnobotany; networking; agroforestry; dry semi-deciduous

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