Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Operational Monitoring and Mass Balance in the Biodegradation of Oil for Two Scenarios: Experimental Plant of Active Sludge and Aerobic Digestor

Version 1 : Received: 30 September 2017 / Approved: 2 October 2017 / Online: 2 October 2017 (08:51:14 CEST)

How to cite: Cisterna, P.; Arancibia, P. Operational Monitoring and Mass Balance in the Biodegradation of Oil for Two Scenarios: Experimental Plant of Active Sludge and Aerobic Digestor. Preprints 2017, 2017100005 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201710.0005.v1). Cisterna, P.; Arancibia, P. Operational Monitoring and Mass Balance in the Biodegradation of Oil for Two Scenarios: Experimental Plant of Active Sludge and Aerobic Digestor. Preprints 2017, 2017100005 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201710.0005.v1).

Abstract

Fats and oils are the most common contaminants in wastewater and are usually discarded through physical processes. This paper studies its elimination through an environmentally friendly biological treatment, yielding good results on both laboratory scale and in the field. In this study a comparative evaluation of the biodegradation of fats and oils in two scenarios were developed in an activated sludge plant at laboratory scale, and a wastewater treatment plant. The full-scale values for some key parameters are compared, such as the oil concentration in the influent and effluent, mass loading and removal efficiency and biodegradation systems. Activated sludge plant at laboratory scale working on a mass load range from 0.2 to 0.8 (kg COD / day / kg MLSS) initially reaches levels of 75% biodegradation thereafter influent concentration is increased and thereby the mass load is increased in a range of working system under high load and biodegradation rates ranging from 71 to 64% are achieved. The actual system consists of a treatment plant wastewater with an aerobic digester for sludge treatment. Fats and oils are retained in a previous degreaser to biological treatment and subsequently sent to the aerobic sludge digester, constituting of thus on a single substrate, resembling an activated sludge plant with extended aeration mode, and levels of biodegradation in the range of 69 to 92%. From this work, we can say that the choice of biological treatment for fats and oils is feasible and adequate. Furthermore, the biomass presents great adaptability to the oil substrate, favored in this case for being the only source of carbon, therefore fats and oils should be removed using biological treatment, instead of the flotation procedure or at most using it as an intermediate process

Subject Areas

Biodegradation; fats and oils; activated sludge

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