Preprint Article Version 1 This version not peer reviewed

Conceal Carry and Race: A Test of Minority Threat Theory in Law Generation

Version 1 : Received: 25 September 2017 / Approved: 27 September 2017 / Online: 27 September 2017 (02:03:15 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Mullins, C.; Kavish, D. Conceal Carry and Race: A Test of Minority Threat Theory in Law Generation. Soc. Sci. 2017, 6, 149. Mullins, C.; Kavish, D. Conceal Carry and Race: A Test of Minority Threat Theory in Law Generation. Soc. Sci. 2017, 6, 149.

Journal reference: Soc. Sci. 2017, 6, 149
DOI: 10.3390/socsci6040149

Abstract

Conceal carry weapon (CCW) laws have generated a great deal of public discussion in the past decades, but little social science attention. Scholarly worked on the topic has been focused on finding potential effects of such laws on crime and victimization; little has attempted to explain the trends behind the adoption of the laws. This paper attempts to fill that gap by testing a series of hypotheses grounded in minority threat approaches. Our paper examines whether or not changes in the racial and ethnic composition of a county predict the voting outcome of Missouri’s 1999 conceal-carry referendum. Findings fail to reject the null hypothesis and show the best predictor of the vote within a county was how that county voted in the 2000 Presidential election.

Subject Areas

minority threat; conceal carry laws; Missouri; race and ethnicity

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