Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Differential Effects of Various Soy Isoflavone Extracts on Bacterial Growth and Human Fibroblast Viability

Version 1 : Received: 13 April 2017 / Approved: 13 April 2017 / Online: 13 April 2017 (05:33:06 CEST)

How to cite: Rzeszótko, A.; Blendowska, A.; Węgrzyn, G.; Pierzynowska, K. Differential Effects of Various Soy Isoflavone Extracts on Bacterial Growth and Human Fibroblast Viability. Preprints 2017, 2017040070 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201704.0070.v1). Rzeszótko, A.; Blendowska, A.; Węgrzyn, G.; Pierzynowska, K. Differential Effects of Various Soy Isoflavone Extracts on Bacterial Growth and Human Fibroblast Viability. Preprints 2017, 2017040070 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201704.0070.v1).

Abstract

Flavonoids, compounds present in many dietary supplements, affect growth of different bacterial species when tested as purified or synthetic substances. Here, we asked if soy isoflavone extracts, commonly used in many products sold as anti-menopausal dietary supplements, influence bacterial growth similarly to synthetic isoflavone, genistein. Four commercially available products were tested in amounts corresponding to genistein concentrations causing inhibition of growth of Vibrio harveyi (a model bacterium sensitive to this isoflavone) and Escherichia coli (a model bacterium resistant to genistein). Differential effects of various extracts on V. harveyi and E. coli growth, from stimulation, through no changes, to inhibition, were observed. Moreover, contrary to genistein, tested extracts caused a decrease (to different extends) in viability of human dermal fibroblasts. These results indicate that effects of various soy isoflavone extracts on bacterial growth and viability of human cells are different, despite similar declared composition of the commercially available products.

Subject Areas

genistein; soy isoflavone extracts; anti-menopausal dietary supplements; bacterial growth; viability of human cells

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Comment 1
Received: 13 April 2017
Commenter: Zuzanna Cyske
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: I'm from the same university as authors.
Comment: I think this is an important work as it underlines the problem of quality
of different of soy-based diet supplements. It is evident that some of
them might cause problems with gut microbiome, and also some might even
cause deleterious reactions of human cells. It appears that such
supplements should be better controlled regarding thier composition, at
least for major compounds.
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