Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Strategies for the Simulation of Sea Ice Organic Chemistry: Arctic Tests and Development

Version 1 : Received: 11 April 2017 / Approved: 12 April 2017 / Online: 12 April 2017 (05:12:28 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Elliott, S.; Jeffery, N.; Hunke, E.; Deal, C.; Jin, M.; Wang, S.; Elliott Smith, E.; Oestreicher, S. Strategies for the Simulation of Sea Ice Organic Chemistry: Arctic Tests and Development. Geosciences 2017, 7, 52. Elliott, S.; Jeffery, N.; Hunke, E.; Deal, C.; Jin, M.; Wang, S.; Elliott Smith, E.; Oestreicher, S. Strategies for the Simulation of Sea Ice Organic Chemistry: Arctic Tests and Development. Geosciences 2017, 7, 52.

Journal reference: Geosciences 2017, 7, 52
DOI: 10.3390/geosciences7030052

Abstract

A numerical mechanism connecting ice algal ecodynamics with the buildup of organic macromolecules is tested within modeled pan-Arctic brine channels. The simulations take place offline in a reduced representation of sea ice geochemistry. Physical driver quantities derive from the global sea ice code CICE, including snow cover, thickness and internal temperature. The framework is averaged over ten boreal biogeographic zones. Computed nutrient-light-salt limited algal growth supports grazing, mortality and carbon flow. Vertical transport is diffusive but responds to pore structure. Simulated bottom layer chlorophyll maxima are reasonable, though delayed by about a month relative to observations due to uncertainties in snow variability. Upper level biota arise intermittently during flooding events. Macromolecular concentrations are tracked as proxy proteins, polysaccharides, lipids and refractory humics. The fresh biopolymers undergo succession and removal by bacteria. Baseline organics enter solely through cell disruption, so that the internal carbon content is initially biased low. By including exudation, agreement with dissolved organic or individual biopolymer data is achieved given strong release coupled to light intensity. Detrital carbon then reaches hundreds of micromolar, sufficient to support structural changes to the ice matrix.

Subject Areas

ice algae; brine channels; organic chemistry; Arctic sea ice; CICE model; mechanism development; biomacromolecules

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