Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Process Heat Generation Potential from Solar Concentration Technologies in Latin America: The Case of Argentina

Version 1 : Received: 16 March 2017 / Approved: 17 March 2017 / Online: 17 March 2017 (04:05:07 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Lillo, I.; Pérez, E.; Moreno, S.; Silva, M. Process Heat Generation Potential from Solar Concentration Technologies in Latin America: The Case of Argentina. Energies 2017, 10, 383. Lillo, I.; Pérez, E.; Moreno, S.; Silva, M. Process Heat Generation Potential from Solar Concentration Technologies in Latin America: The Case of Argentina. Energies 2017, 10, 383.

Journal reference: Energies 2017, 10, 383
DOI: 10.3390/en10030383

Abstract

This paper evaluates the potential of solar concentration technologies—compound parabolic collector (CPC), linear Fresnel collector (LFC) and parabolic trough collector (PTC)—as an alternative to conventional sources of energy for industrial processes in Latin America, where high levels of solar radiation and isolated areas without energy supply exist. The analysis is addressed from energy, economic and environmental perspective. A specific application for Argentina in which fourteen locations are analyzed is considered. Results show that solar concentration technologies can be an economically and environmentally viable alternative. Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) ranges between 2.5 and 16.9 c€/kWh/m2 and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions avoided range between 33 and 348 kgCO2/(m2·year). CPC technology stands out as the most recommendable technology when the working fluid temperature ranges from 373K to 423K. As the working fluid temperature increases the differences between the LCOE values of the CPC and LFC technologies decrease. When 523K is reached LFC technology is the one which presents the lowest LCOE values for all analyzed sites, while the LCOE values of PTC technology are close to CPC technology values. Results show that solar concentration technologies have reached economic and environmental competitiveness levels under certain scenarios, mainly linked to solar resource available, thermal level requirements and solar technology cost.

Subject Areas

feasibility; solar thermal energy; heat process; greenhouse gas emissions

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