Preprint Review Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

Natural Pathogen Inhibiting Chemistry to Replace Toxic Treatment of Microbes and Biofilm in Cooling Towers

Version 1 : Received: 15 December 2016 / Approved: 19 December 2016 / Online: 19 December 2016 (04:29:50 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 19 December 2016 / Approved: 20 December 2016 / Online: 20 December 2016 (10:26:22 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Brouse, L.; Brouse, R.; Brouse, D. Natural Pathogen Control Chemistry to Replace Toxic Treatment of Microbes and Biofilm in Cooling Towers. Pathogens 2017, 6, 14. Brouse, L.; Brouse, R.; Brouse, D. Natural Pathogen Control Chemistry to Replace Toxic Treatment of Microbes and Biofilm in Cooling Towers. Pathogens 2017, 6, 14.

Journal reference: Pathogens 2017, 6, 14
DOI: 10.3390/pathogens6020014

Abstract

Application of toxic antibacterial agents is considered necessary to control prevalent fresh water microorganisms in evaporative cooling water systems, but these agents can adversely affect the environment and human health. Alternatively, natural antibacterial water chemistry has been applied in industrial cooling water systems for over 10 years with excellent results. The tower water chemistry method concentrates natural salts in highly-softened water to produce elevated pH and dissolved solids, with low calcium and magnesium. This practice conserves water while generating only a small volume of non-toxic natural salt concentrate for cost efficient separation and disposal if required. This review presents a novel perspective of natural antimicrobial chemistry for inhibiting parasitic microbiome functional relationships within the bio-triad of Legionella outbreaks, "Trojan Protozoans" and biofilms. The review further examines practical application and function of polyvalent metal ions in the inhibition of biofilms. Reducing global dependence on toxic antibacterial agents discharged to the environment is an emerging concern due to their impact on the natural microbiome, plants, animals and humans. Discharge of antibacterial agents also contributes to development of pathogen resistance. Use of natural antibacterial chemistry can play a key role in managing the cooling water environment in a more ecologically sustainable manner.

Subject Areas

pathogens; Legionella; amoeba; protozoa; biofilm; antibacterial; antimicrobial; cooling towers; biocides; polyvalent metals

Readers' Comments and Ratings (0)

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Rate this article
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0
Leave a public comment

×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.