Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

The Effects of Asthma Medications on Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Human Monocytes

Version 1 : Received: 24 October 2016 / Approved: 24 October 2016 / Online: 24 October 2016 (05:50:30 CEST)

How to cite: Tsai, M.; Lin, Y.; Lin, C.; Huang, M.; Lee, M.; Kuo, C.; Hung, C.; Kuo, P. The Effects of Asthma Medications on Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Human Monocytes. Preprints 2016, 2016100101 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201610.0101.v1). Tsai, M.; Lin, Y.; Lin, C.; Huang, M.; Lee, M.; Kuo, C.; Hung, C.; Kuo, P. The Effects of Asthma Medications on Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Human Monocytes. Preprints 2016, 2016100101 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201610.0101.v1).

Abstract

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease induced by many environmental factors. The inhalation of allergens and pollutants promote the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production leading to airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling in allergic asthma. The effects of asthma medications on ROS production are unclear. The present study investigated the anti-ROS effects of current asthma medications including inhaled corticosteroid (ICS; budesonide and fluticasone), leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA; montelukast), long acting β2 agonists (LABAs; salmeterol and formoterol) and a new extra-LABA (indacaterol). The human monocyte cell line THP-1 cells were pre-treated with different concentrations of the asthma medications at different time-points after hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stimulation. H2O2 production was measured with DCFH-DA by flow cytometry. Montelukast, fluticasone and salmeterol suppressed H2O2-induced ROS production. Indacaterol enhanced H2O2-induced ROS production. Budesonide and formoterol alone had no anti-ROS effects, but the combination of these two drugs significantly suppressed H2O2-induced ROS production. Different asthma medications have different anti-ROS effects on monocytes. The combination therapy with LABA and ICS seemed not be the only choice for asthma control. Montelukast may be also a good supplemental treatment for the poorly-controlled asthma because of its powerful anti-ROS effects. Our findings provide a novel therapeutic view in asthma.

Subject Areas

reactive oxygen species (ROS); asthma; montelukast; long-acting β2 agonist (LABA); corticosteroid; monocyte

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