Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Determinants of Parents’ Motive to Vaccinate their 12–17 Years Old Children against COVID-19 in North Kivu (DRC)

Version 1 : Received: 16 August 2022 / Approved: 8 September 2022 / Online: 8 September 2022 (03:11:45 CEST)

How to cite: Mustafa, S.H.B.; Nzaji, M.K.; O, R.O. Determinants of Parents’ Motive to Vaccinate their 12–17 Years Old Children against COVID-19 in North Kivu (DRC). Preprints 2022, 2022090116 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202209.0116.v1). Mustafa, S.H.B.; Nzaji, M.K.; O, R.O. Determinants of Parents’ Motive to Vaccinate their 12–17 Years Old Children against COVID-19 in North Kivu (DRC). Preprints 2022, 2022090116 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202209.0116.v1).

Abstract

Background: Vaccinating children against COVID-19 is an essential public health strategy in order to reach herd immunity and prevent illness among children and adults. Parents are facing tremendous stress in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic and the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccination program for children. In this study, we aimed to investigate parents’ willingness to vaccinate their children against COVID-19 in North Kivu province (DRC). Methods: A cross-sectional survey between December 01, 2021 to January 20, 2022 in 6 health zones (Goma, Karisimbi, Butembo, Beni, Kamango and Katwa) was conducted in the province of North Kivu. In each health zone, we selected 5 clusters (Health area) using the method of probabilistic selection proportional to population size. In total, 522 parents participated in our study. Results: Overall, 32.8% of parents intended to vaccinate their children. In the multivariate analysis, younger age of parents (aOR : 2.40, CI : [1.50-3.83]), higher level of fear that “a member of my family” could contract COVID-19 (aOR : 2.35, CI : [1.38-4.02]), higher level of perceived vulnerability to COVID-19 within the family (aOR : 1.70, CI : [1.005-2.2881]), higher level of perceived susceptibility to COVID-19 within the family (aOR : 3.07, CI : [1.80-5.23]), and history of vaccination against COVID-19 among parents (aOR : 16.47, CI : [8.39-32.33]), were significantly associated with the intention to have their children or adolescents vaccinated. Conclusion: Willingness of parents to vaccinate their children against the COVID-19 vaccination was low in North Kivu. There is undeniably in this region a need to reinsure the populations about vaccine safety for both children and adults. Public health authorities should also address widespread misinformation about vaccines in a timely manner.

Keywords

parents’ motive to vaccinate; coronavirus disease; children

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Other

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