Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Medical Education: Patients‘ Perspectives on Clinical Training and Informed Consent

Version 1 : Received: 9 May 2022 / Approved: 10 May 2022 / Online: 10 May 2022 (03:52:44 CEST)

How to cite: Santos, I.G.; Santos, C.C.; Duarte, I. Medical Education: Patients‘ Perspectives on Clinical Training and Informed Consent. Preprints 2022, 2022050126 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202205.0126.v1). Santos, I.G.; Santos, C.C.; Duarte, I. Medical Education: Patients‘ Perspectives on Clinical Training and Informed Consent. Preprints 2022, 2022050126 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202205.0126.v1).

Abstract

There are complex ethical dilemmas inherent in medicine teaching, particularly in clinical prac-tice involving actual patients. Questions must be raised on fulfilling medical students' training needs while still respecting patients' fundamental rights to autonomy and privacy. We aimed to assess patients' perspectives regarding medical students' involvement in their medical care. An observational, cross-sectional study was developed, and an interview-like questionnaire was ap-plied randomly to patients waiting for a consult/admitted to three distinct departments: General Surgery, Obstetrics/Gynaecology, and Infectious Diseases. Of the 77% interviewed patients who reported previous experiences with medical students, only 59% stated that they were asked for consent for their participation and 28% that students had adequately introduced themselves. Pa-tients from Gynaecology/Obstetrics were the ones who reported lower rates of these practices and were also the ones who were most bothered by students' presence, stating that they would refuse students' participation in the future. Male patients received more explanations than female pa-tients regarding the same matters. 35% of patients stated they would feel more comfortable without the medical students' presence. The study shows a need to pay closer attention to ful-filling patients' fundamental rights.

Keywords

medical education; medical ethics; autonomy; patients' perspectives

Subject

SOCIAL SCIENCES, Other

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