Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Magnetic Resonance for Differential Diagnosis of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Diagnostic and Prognostic Implications

Version 1 : Received: 3 January 2022 / Approved: 5 January 2022 / Online: 5 January 2022 (13:10:00 CET)

How to cite: Aquaro, G.D.; Corsi, E.; Todiere, G.; Grigoratos, C.; Barison, A.; Barra, V.; di Bella, G.; Emdin, M.; Ricci, F.; Pingitore, A. Magnetic Resonance for Differential Diagnosis of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Diagnostic and Prognostic Implications. Preprints 2022, 2022010042 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0042.v1). Aquaro, G.D.; Corsi, E.; Todiere, G.; Grigoratos, C.; Barison, A.; Barra, V.; di Bella, G.; Emdin, M.; Ricci, F.; Pingitore, A. Magnetic Resonance for Differential Diagnosis of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Diagnostic and Prognostic Implications. Preprints 2022, 2022010042 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0042.v1).

Abstract

Background: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) may be due to different causes, ranging from benign secondary forms to severe cardiomyopathies. Transthoracic Echocardiography (TTE) and ECG are the first level examination for LVH diagnosis. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) defines accurately LVH type, extent and severity. Objectives: to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic role of CMR in patients with TTE and/or ECG evidence of LVH. Methods: We performed CMR in 300 consecutive patients with echocardiographic and/or ECG signs of LVH. Results: Overall, 275 patients had TTE evidence of LVH with initial suspicion of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in 132 (44%), cardiac amyloidosis in 41 (14%), hypertensive LVH in 48 (16%), aortic stenosis in 4 (1%), undetermined LVH in 50(16%). The initial echocardiographic diagnostic suspicion of LVH was confirmed in 172 patients (57.3%) and changed in 128 patients (42.7%, p<0.0001): the diagnosis of HCM increased from 44% to 71% of patients; hypertensive and undetermined LVH decreased significantly (respectively to 4% and 5%). CMR allowed a diagnosis in 41 out of 50 (82%) with undetermined LVH at TTE. CMR also identified HCM in 17 out of 25 patients with apparently normal echo but with ECG criteria for LVH. Finally, the reclassification of the diagnosis by CMR was associated with a change of survival risk of patients: after CMR reclassification no events occurred in patients with undetermined or hypertensive LVH. Conclusions: CMR changed echocardiographic suspicion in almost half of patients with LVH. In the subgroup of patient with abnormal ECG, CMR identified LVH (particularly HCM) in 80% of patients. This study highlights the indication of CMR to better characterize the type, extent and severity of LVH detected at echocardiography and suspected with ECG.

Keywords

Left ventricular hypertrophy; Echocardiography; Magnetic Resonance; Prognosis

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Cardiology

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