Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Characteristics of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Smokers Exposed to Anti-smoking Marketing in South Australia

Version 1 : Received: 31 December 2021 / Approved: 4 January 2022 / Online: 4 January 2022 (15:08:35 CET)

How to cite: Trigg, J.; Shen, D.; Morris, J.; Blunt, J. Characteristics of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Smokers Exposed to Anti-smoking Marketing in South Australia. Preprints 2022, 2022010010 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0010.v1). Trigg, J.; Shen, D.; Morris, J.; Blunt, J. Characteristics of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Smokers Exposed to Anti-smoking Marketing in South Australia. Preprints 2022, 2022010010 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0010.v1).

Abstract

Background: Smoking is disproportionately prevalent among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian peoples, with 39% of Indigenous Australians aged over 15 years smoking daily. Efforts to reduce this high prevalence include culturally focused media campaigns, designed using community consultation, highlighting the need to determine how such health messaging is received by smokers. This study aimed to examine Indigenous Australian smokers’ reactions to a culturally focused anti-smoking mass media campaign—'Give up Smokes’. Methods: Intercept surveying across health services and events used recorded demographics, smoking status, quit attempts, smoking health effects, anti-smoking campaign recall, social support, and campaign reactions. Participants rated campaign images in five domains: 1) whether it made them stop and think; 2) personal relevance; 3) believability of design and message; 4) prompting concern about smoking; and 5) motivation towards quitting. Cluster analysis was used to segment smoker types. Results: Smoking health effects knowledge was high, and did not differ by quit readiness, attempts, or social support. Cessation support access was higher among those with greater readiness to quit. Social smoking behaviour and confidence to support others quitting did not significantly differ between participants, however importance of others quitting did. Quit readiness, attempts, and social support were associated with reaction to campaign design, but not message recall. Four types of smokers were described, using smoking characteristics, who differed in campaign message reactions. Conclusions: Strategies using campaign-exposed smoker characteristics to inform culturally focused health promotion are discussed in relation to four identified types of smokers.

Keywords

Indigenous health; smoking; social marketing; tobacco; messaging

Subject

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, Social Psychology

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.