Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Silver Flowerlike Structures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

Version 1 : Received: 26 October 2021 / Approved: 28 October 2021 / Online: 28 October 2021 (10:15:52 CEST)

How to cite: Ivanov, V.G.; Tsutsumanova, G.; Todorov, N.; Russev, S.; Abrashev, M.; Lukoyanov, A. Silver Flowerlike Structures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy. Preprints 2021, 2021100432 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202110.0432.v1). Ivanov, V.G.; Tsutsumanova, G.; Todorov, N.; Russev, S.; Abrashev, M.; Lukoyanov, A. Silver Flowerlike Structures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy. Preprints 2021, 2021100432 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202110.0432.v1).

Abstract

Micro- and nanoflowers are a class of materials composed of particles with high surface-to-volume ratio. They are being extensively studied in the last decade due to simple preparation protocols and promising applications in biosensing, as drug delivery agents, for water purification and so on. Flowerlike objects, due to their highly irregular surface, may act also as plasmonic materials, providing resonant coupling between optical waves and surface plasmon excitations. This fact infers for the possibility to use micro- and nanoflowers as effective surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate materials. Here, we report on the design and Raman enhancement properties of silver flowerlike structures, deposited on aluminum surface. A simple and cost-effective fabrication method is described, which leads to SERS substrates of high developed surface area. The morphology of the silver flowers on a nanoscale is characterized by self-organized quasiperiodic stacks of nanosheets, which act as plasmonic cavity-resonators. The substrates were tested against rhodamine-6G (R6G) water solutions of concentration varying between 10–3 M and 10–7 M. Optimal SERS enhancement factors of up to 105 were established at R6G concentrations in the range 10–6 – 10–7 M.

Keywords

SERS; SERS substrates; nanoflowers;;surface plasmon; nanocavity resonator

Subject

MATERIALS SCIENCE, Nanotechnology

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