Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Short-Term Cumulative Exposure to Ambient Traffic-Related Black Carbon and Blood Pressure: MMDA Traffic Enforcers’ Health Study

Version 1 : Received: 28 September 2021 / Approved: 30 September 2021 / Online: 30 September 2021 (16:08:10 CEST)

How to cite: Regencia, Z.J.G.; Dalmacion, G.V.; Ligsay, A.D.; Baja, E.S. Short-Term Cumulative Exposure to Ambient Traffic-Related Black Carbon and Blood Pressure: MMDA Traffic Enforcers’ Health Study. Preprints 2021, 2021090528 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0528.v1). Regencia, Z.J.G.; Dalmacion, G.V.; Ligsay, A.D.; Baja, E.S. Short-Term Cumulative Exposure to Ambient Traffic-Related Black Carbon and Blood Pressure: MMDA Traffic Enforcers’ Health Study. Preprints 2021, 2021090528 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0528.v1).

Abstract

Exposure to traffic-related air pollution is linked with acute alterations in blood pressure (BP). We examined the cumulative short-term effect of black carbon (BC) exposure on systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP and assessed effect modification by participant characteristics. SBP and DBP were repeatedly measured on 152 traffic enforcers. Using a linear mixed-effects model with random intercepts, quadratic (QCDL) and cubic (CCDL) constrained distributed lag models were fitted to estimate the cumulative effect of BC concentration on SBP and DBP during the 10-hours (daily exposure) and 7-days (weekly exposure) before the BP measurement. Ambient BC was related to increased BP with QCDL models. An interquartile range change in BC cumulative during the 7-days before the BP measurement was associated with increased BP [1.2% change in mean SBP, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.1 to 2.3; and 0.5% change in mean DBP, 95% CI, –0.8 to 1.7]. Moreover, the association between the 10-hours cumulative BC exposure and SBP was stronger for females (4.0% change, 95% CI: 2.1–5.9) versus males, and for obese (2.9% change, 95% CI: 1.0–4.8) vs. non-obese traffic enforcers. Short-term cumulative exposure to ambient traffic-related BC could bring about cardiovascular diseases through mechanisms involving increased BP.

Keywords

black carbon; systolic blood pressure; diastolic blood pressure; sex; obesity; traffic enforcers

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